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Wed, Oct. 1st, 2003, 01:38 am
intriguing

I haven't necessarily been all that up on the presidential race yet, but this seems interesting. Wesley Clark was the head US general during the War in Kosovo, which as to all decent standards was well conducted. He has been buffing up his image without declaring a run for the presidency, but he is definitely someone to watch for the Democratic bid. I think after reading this article that it would be interesting to see him run with Howard Dean as VP. Ultimately, he has the military history that will attract middle road voters, while Dean will bring his supporters rather than disperse them if he loses the primaries. Really, it could go either way, so with either as the main candidate it would be a strong bid, but it seems like Dean as VP might help more than Clark as VP, since Clark might have a higher appeal and while Clark might do as well if not moreso than Dean for President, Dean would definitely bring his camp along even if for VP. Also, Dean would then have a very strong bid for President at a later time, building a chain rather than blowing it on one go. Anyway, read the article, I promise it will at least be informative.

http://www.theatlantic.com/issues/2003/10/green.htm

In many presidential campaigns a moment arrives when disappointment with the declared candidates sets in, and a dream candidate emerges—one who seems to personify all that is missing from the field. Colin Powell was once such a figure for the Republicans, and Mario Cuomo for the Democrats. Often a candidate's very unavailability is a large part of his appeal. The paradox is that the hold on the imagination that attractive outsiders have from afar often disappears when they enter the race, and suffer the same scrutiny and attack as any other candidate. Perhaps for this reason few of them actually declare themselves. Howard Dean, who started out as this kind of outsider, still enjoys something like this hold, even though he declared early. The person playing the role of Hamlet candidate is Wesley Clark—a retired four-star general, a former NATO Supreme Allied Commander, a Rhodes scholar, a war hero, and, in every meaningful way save actual registration, a Democrat.

Wed, Oct. 1st, 2003 10:37 am (UTC)
evan

i dunno what news you're reading, but clark is now running as a presidential candidate. i think he's ahead of dean in the polls.

Wed, Oct. 1st, 2003 11:24 am (UTC)
holyloki

haha. figures.
no news, basically. i don't deal in actualities, just conceptual nonsense...see what my education has done to me?